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Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Frank Lloyd Wright's David Wright House

I and members of the Contemporary Forum, an art-aficionado group, had the distinct pleasure of touring Frank Lloyd Wright's David Wright House in Phoenix, Arizona. David Wright was FLlW's son from the first marriage, and both he and his wife, Gladys, lived very long lives. David was in the concrete block business, so the house is, of course, concrete block. However, it's odd that the house was first conceived in wood -- probably because of it's unique circular shape.

The house spirals up a wide ramp to the main floor which "floats" above the hot desert floor and allows breezes to flow underneath. There is a small pool by the ramp with a central garden that the house surrounds. All of the walls are block inside and out with Mr. Wright's trademark red concrete floors. The wood cabinetry is built in, of course, and the wood board ceilings are some of the most intricate and beautiful I've seen. The finish carpentry in this house is incredible!

The house has been shrouded in mystery for years, and as I have understsood, no strangers had been allowed to see it for decades. I remember visiting in 1995 with a friend of mine. We stood at the driveway by the mailbox that simply read "Wright". There were tarps over the windows facing the street. It was very eerie.

Unfortunately, David and Gladys passed on in the house, and last I knew, it was for sale. It was an honor to be able to walk through it's graceful, flowing space -- to imagine living in it day by day, enjoying both fireplaces on cold desert evenings. Once again, Wright was able to build an idea, based on the organic principles he maintained all his life. It's not merely another house, but instead a free, creative, thoughtful response to Client, site, and human imagination in the hands of a master! Enjoy the photos below.

1 comment:

  1. I borrowed the first photo for my FB cover photo, as the David and Gladys Wright House is in unfortunately in danger of being demolished by its current owners. My hope is that people will spread images like these, and that before it's too late, a long-term owner, concerned with preserving the structure, will be found.


    Andrew Knochel